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Barriers to pain management differ in cancer and non-cancer

A recent study published in Pain management nursing suggested that medical professionals should immediately address pain management. The researchers enrolled 200 patients in two cohorts: patients with cancer and patients with chronic conditions without cancer. The most important barrier to managing pain was fear of drug side effects, while fatalistic attitudes towards pain and its treatment ranked lowest in terms of perceived barriers. Age had a negative correlation with concerns about the physical effects of pain (R= −0.287, P<0.01), communication problems (R=−0.263, P0.01), and the fear of drug damage (R= −0.284, P0.01) in patients with non-cancerous conditions. This correlation was not observed in the cancer patients. Patients with cancer showed a higher mean fatalism score (mean = 2.12, SD = 0.78) compared to those without cancer (mean = 1.91, SD = 0.68), while those with non-cancer chronic diseases faced greater challenges in communication (mean=2.78, SD=0.78) than patients with cancer (mean=2.49, SD=0.65; T= −2.899; P=0.005). The results highlight a significant difference in the experience of pain management barriers between the two groups. Researchers emphasized the need to improve pain management strategies and ultimately improve the quality of care for all patients with pain.